Snoqualmie Forest

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Areas we commonly refer to as "Tokul Creek" and "Griffin Creek" are very small portions of larger private land currently owned by Hancock Timber Resource Group. This vast tree farm, known as the Snoqualmie Forest, contains approximately 100,000 acres of forestland in the foothills of eastern King and Snohomish counties, extending from Fall City and the north side of Mt. Si in the South, to Mt. Index at Hwy 2 to the North. Access points to the Tree Farm near Fall City are barely 45 minutes away from downtown Seattle.
 
Areas we commonly refer to as "Tokul Creek" and "Griffin Creek" are very small portions of larger private land currently owned by Hancock Timber Resource Group. This vast tree farm, known as the Snoqualmie Forest, contains approximately 100,000 acres of forestland in the foothills of eastern King and Snohomish counties, extending from Fall City and the north side of Mt. Si in the South, to Mt. Index at Hwy 2 to the North. Access points to the Tree Farm near Fall City are barely 45 minutes away from downtown Seattle.
  
"Griffin" usually means the trail system north of (and accessed from) Griffin Creek Road.
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"Griffin" usually means the trail system north of (and accessed from) Griffin Creek Road.  This area has been closed to recreation by the new owner.
  
 
"West Tokul" is bounded by Griffin Creek on the north, the Snoqualmie Valley trail on the west/south, and a section of private housing off of 356th Ave NE in the east. It's usually accessed by parking in Fall City and heading up SE 39th Place to the Snoqualmie Valley Trail (SVT), turning northward, and then up into the trails. (Sections 11, 2, and 1 on a topo map.)
 
"West Tokul" is bounded by Griffin Creek on the north, the Snoqualmie Valley trail on the west/south, and a section of private housing off of 356th Ave NE in the east. It's usually accessed by parking in Fall City and heading up SE 39th Place to the Snoqualmie Valley Trail (SVT), turning northward, and then up into the trails. (Sections 11, 2, and 1 on a topo map.)
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Hancock Timber allows passive recreational use by the public on the Tree Farm, and the land has provided an amazing array of recreational opportunities for equestrians, mountain bikers and casual hikers for many years. Because the southern boundary of the Tree Farm is adjacent to King County Park's Snoqualmie Valley Trail, which runs from Snoqualmie Falls through Carnation to Duvall, outdoor recreation enthusiasts have enjoyed easy access to the land from various access points. Although all the trails are open to mountain bikes, many of them were built by the equestrian community over the years, so please be courteous to the horse riders when you come across them on the trails.
 
Hancock Timber allows passive recreational use by the public on the Tree Farm, and the land has provided an amazing array of recreational opportunities for equestrians, mountain bikers and casual hikers for many years. Because the southern boundary of the Tree Farm is adjacent to King County Park's Snoqualmie Valley Trail, which runs from Snoqualmie Falls through Carnation to Duvall, outdoor recreation enthusiasts have enjoyed easy access to the land from various access points. Although all the trails are open to mountain bikes, many of them were built by the equestrian community over the years, so please be courteous to the horse riders when you come across them on the trails.
  
During summer dry spells, Hancock will occasionally close the land due to fire hazards; please keep an eye on the BBTC website for closures.
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During summer dry spells, Hancock will occasionally close the land due to fire hazards; please keep an eye on the Evergreen website for closures.
  
 
Remember also that the property is an actively harvested tree farm. You may encounter logging trucks and other vehicles, especially on weekdays. They won't expect a bicyclist; best to yield the road whenever you come across a vehicle.
 
Remember also that the property is an actively harvested tree farm. You may encounter logging trucks and other vehicles, especially on weekdays. They won't expect a bicyclist; best to yield the road whenever you come across a vehicle.
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When you're riding in East Tokul, you may hear gun shots from the firing range near Tokul town. It's located on the other side of the SVT, far from the trails. However, people also hunt in the tree farm. Be cautious. Consider wearing bright clothing during hunting season.
 
When you're riding in East Tokul, you may hear gun shots from the firing range near Tokul town. It's located on the other side of the SVT, far from the trails. However, people also hunt in the tree farm. Be cautious. Consider wearing bright clothing during hunting season.
 
==Is There a Map of the Areas?==
 
 
The previous owner (Weyerhaeuser) requested that no maps be publicly distributed. A map is currently under construction. Stay tuned.
 
  
 
==Land Ownership History==
 
==Land Ownership History==

Revision as of 09:04, 12 September 2011

Contents

Where is it?

Areas we commonly refer to as "Tokul Creek" and "Griffin Creek" are very small portions of larger private land currently owned by Hancock Timber Resource Group. This vast tree farm, known as the Snoqualmie Forest, contains approximately 100,000 acres of forestland in the foothills of eastern King and Snohomish counties, extending from Fall City and the north side of Mt. Si in the South, to Mt. Index at Hwy 2 to the North. Access points to the Tree Farm near Fall City are barely 45 minutes away from downtown Seattle.

"Griffin" usually means the trail system north of (and accessed from) Griffin Creek Road. This area has been closed to recreation by the new owner.

"West Tokul" is bounded by Griffin Creek on the north, the Snoqualmie Valley trail on the west/south, and a section of private housing off of 356th Ave NE in the east. It's usually accessed by parking in Fall City and heading up SE 39th Place to the Snoqualmie Valley Trail (SVT), turning northward, and then up into the trails. (Sections 11, 2, and 1 on a topo map.)

"East Tokul" has trails closer to Snoqualmie Falls and the Tokul settlement. You can park where the SVT intersects 356th Ave NE, or in the upper parking lot at the Falls.

"West" and "East" Tokul are connected by many forest roads farther north, and you can do nice long forest road loops in the property.

Access to Mountain Bikes?

Hancock Timber allows passive recreational use by the public on the Tree Farm, and the land has provided an amazing array of recreational opportunities for equestrians, mountain bikers and casual hikers for many years. Because the southern boundary of the Tree Farm is adjacent to King County Park's Snoqualmie Valley Trail, which runs from Snoqualmie Falls through Carnation to Duvall, outdoor recreation enthusiasts have enjoyed easy access to the land from various access points. Although all the trails are open to mountain bikes, many of them were built by the equestrian community over the years, so please be courteous to the horse riders when you come across them on the trails.

During summer dry spells, Hancock will occasionally close the land due to fire hazards; please keep an eye on the Evergreen website for closures.

Remember also that the property is an actively harvested tree farm. You may encounter logging trucks and other vehicles, especially on weekdays. They won't expect a bicyclist; best to yield the road whenever you come across a vehicle.

What's It Like?

Once inside, the Tree Farm offers hundreds of miles of logging roads and doubletrack for year-round riding, as well as many miles of trails. Terrain is gentle and low enough to remain snow-free through winter months, yet contains many dips and rises that will provide ample work-out for most riders. Vast expanse of the Tree Farm provides ideal habitats for many species of wildlife, recent sightings have included deer, black bears, cougars and various birds of prey. It also offers visitors feeling of solitude inside secluded woods, despite the existence of residential developments nearby. For more information regarding the riding areas and access to them, please check out the following links:

Word of caution: There are many small spur trails that will lead right to private residences that exist between Tokul East and West areas, and alongside Griffin Creek. If you happened to be exploring the area and came across No Trespassing signs, please turn around immediately in respect to the private land owners.

When you're riding in East Tokul, you may hear gun shots from the firing range near Tokul town. It's located on the other side of the SVT, far from the trails. However, people also hunt in the tree farm. Be cautious. Consider wearing bright clothing during hunting season.

Land Ownership History

In 2002, there was an initiative by a preservation group called the Evergreen Forest Trust to acquire the land with public funds. This failed and in 2003, Weyerhaeuser sold the land to Hancock Timber Resource Group, the current owner. Then in 2004, King County acquired the development rights to 90% of the tree farm, ensuring that it will not be lost to sprawl.

Hancock will continue to operate the property as a working forest, so this does not prevent logging except in certain reserve zones that protect views, streams, or lakes.